Celery Soup

More fun using old cookbooks!  I had a lot of celery, so I made celery soup. I merged two recipes: the 1896 Fannie Farmer cookbook celery soup recipe, and the How to Cook Everything braised celery recipe:

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The Fannie Farmer recipe calls for boiling the celery, which seemed like it would waste some tasty nutrients:

1896 Fannie Farmer Cookbook: Celery Soup

So instead I braised the celery, according to the recipe in How to Cook Everything Vegetarian. (I didn’t know you could braise celery, but apparently it’s really tasty even by itself!) It certainly made a great base to the soup. I also sautéed the onion in butter a little before adding the milk, because it’s just tastier that way. I did not push anything through the sieve—I left the onions in, and used an immersion blender, so there were little flecks of green in the final bit of soup. My one mistake was not cooking the butter and flour together to make a proper roux (I should have used a second pot, perhaps?) so there was a little bit of raw flour flavor in the soup. Not too bad, though.

I didn’t take a picture of the final product, so you will have to use your imaginations!  Next time 🙂

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4 thoughts on “Celery Soup

  1. I may be showing my ignorance here, but in the case of a soup, why would boiling be worse for nutrients than braising? The nutrients are either in the celery, or they’re in the water (or they’re killed by heat in either case). Or does the recipe call for throwing away the boiling water afterwards?I ask as someone who frequently makes soups by throwing veggies into boiling water.

  2. <html><head></head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>If you don’t drain the water away, boiling is fine!</div><div>The Fannie Farmer recipe, though, if you read carefully, boils the celery and then throws that water away…</div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); ">For the potato soup I made tonight, I did just boil the potatoes in water.</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); ">Same with stews—you get the good broth from what comes out of the veggies (or meat, or bones in stock)</span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "><br></span></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="-webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(26, 26, 26, 0.296875); -webkit-composition-fill-color: rgba(175, 192, 227, 0.230469); -webkit-composition-frame-color: rgba(77, 128, 180, 0.230469); "></span></div></body></html>

  3. Right, I wasn’t sure if the water came back on the next page after the seive step. Throwing it out seem silly. My mom’s soups always start or grow with the addition of the boiling/steaming water from veggie dishes. I don’t usually boil/steam enough veggies to do that myself, but my soups are certainly all about boiling beans and veggies and meat until they make the stock tasty and thick.

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